Graham Sharman

Dean

Role

  • Dean

 

Graham Sharman has been closely involved in the development of osteopathy for over 25 years.  At the ESO his main focus is osteopathic education management and leadership.

 

Academic & Professional Background

With a previous training in agriculture and business management and coming from a commercial background, Graham changed career to graduate as an osteopath in 1991. Whilst working in private practice, he initially worked as a researcher at the British School of Osteopathy and later moved into education at the school, setting up and leading the mixed mode extended pathway that marked a step change for the school as it successfully embarked on part-time osteopathic education. Leaving his role as co-ordinator for both part-time and full-time programmes, he moved to the London School of Osteopathy where he developed its new programme that led to the School’s successful accreditation with the new General Osteopathic Council.

The newly formed GOsC was in the midst of registering new osteopaths and continuing to accredit osteopathy schools when he joined its Education Directorate. There he became Head of Education and was closely involved with the registration of individuals applying to join the new statutory register. He developed and led the GOsC’s mentoring scheme for osteopaths whose skills needed refining and led on the initial development stages of the statutory CPD scheme. At the time accreditation of osteopathy schools was done in-house and he led some of these visits. Developing policy and education strategy was part of the role.

He left to work for Oxford Brookes University as Programme Leader for osteopathy and led on the development of its part-time and on the development of the UK’s first Master’s in Osteopathy programme. Later he became Head of Department with responsibility for osteopathy, physiotherapy, social work and occupational therapy programmes. He was also responsible for clinical education for these and nursing programmes.  Later he returned to the BSO where he led on the development of its part-time programme and post graduate programmes and was involved in its application for taught degree awarding powers.

Graham has maintained his working relationship with the GOsC since he left them in 2002, and has been an assessor for EU and overseas applications from osteopaths wishing to join the register continuously since then. He has also served two terms on the GOsC Fitness to Practise Panel. He is also an external examiner for osteopathy programmes, consultant for a university on its osteopathy programmes and is a Quality Assurance Agency osteopathy visitor.